Friedel Bohny-Reiter

Overview

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Friedel Bohny-Reiter born Vienna, Austro-Hungary May 20, 1908 (d. 2001). Swiss nurse in wartime France. Saved lives of many Jewish children; honored as Righteous Among Nations, 1990.

Quotations

We lived in fear of raids. . . One day Vichy police came to look for 72 refugees, allegedly to check their papers, and I managed to bluff them and gain some time; it was necessary to hide the children in the farms around.” (AJPN.org Bohny; photo babelio.com)

Elsa Brändström

Overview

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Elsa Brändström born St. Petersburg, Russia March 26, 1888 (d. 1948). “Angel of Siberia.” Swedish nurse. Aided and repatriated German and Austrian solders, and cared for their orphans. Five-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, 1922-29.

Quotations

It is up to us women to heel (sic) what the war has broken, to mother the suffering and to help them to get back to their belief in humanity. We must give the victims of the war back their desire to live and to become again useful human beings.” (1923 speech to US women, in Matthiew Stibbe, “Elsa Brȁndström”, Ingrid Sharp, Aftermaths of War, p. 333; photo Wikipedia)

Alice Brügger

Overview

Alice Brügger born Frauenfeld, Thurgau, Switzerland December 2, 1896 (d. 1988). Quaker educator. Co-founder of first nonviolent peace corps Service Civil International with Hélène Monastier and Pierre Cérésole.

Quotations

[D]eepening of the peace idea in detail is the best defense against propaganda and, consequently, against war psychosis.” (International Civil Service, June 1949)

Sarah Jane Baines

Overview

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Sarah Jane Baines born Birmingham, England November 30, 1866 (d. 1951). British-Australian suffragist. First suffragist tried by jury, 1908; served six weeks. Arrested 15 times. Escaped to Australia, where she co-founded Women’s Peace Army opposing World War I, 1914. Opposed conscription, 1915-17, for which she was sentenced to nine months in prison, but later freed.

Quotations

To fight for that which is better and nobler in this world is to live in the highest sense, but to submit and tolerate the evils which exist is to merely vegetate in the sewers of iniquity.” (The Socialist, April 11, 1919; quote & photo wikipedia)

Elisa Branco

Overview

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Elisa Branco Batista born Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil December 29, 1912 (d. 2001). Brazilian feminist, textile worker, and peace activist. Vice-President, Council of Brazilian Peace Advocates, 1949-50; member of World Peace Council, 1951-64. Received 51-month prison sentence for opposing mobilization of Brazilian troops in Korean War, 1950; served 20 months. Other arrests followed, 1964, 1971. Awarded Stalin Peace Prize, 1952.

Quotations

Our boys will not go to Korea as solders” (banner, Sept. 7, 1950; photo wikicommons)

Genny Bove

Overview

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Genny Bove born London, England February 27, 1962 (d. 2018). Welsh peace activist. “Cyclists Say No To War” trip to Aldermaston, 2008; led nine women in protest at Raytheon missile plant, Broughton, Wales, 2008. Arrested for posting peace banners, 2013.

Quotations

NATO is, after all, responsible for countless civilian deaths around the world and—as a heavily nuclear-armed power engaged in wars of aggression, and planning more—NATO poses a significant threat to all life on earth.” (wiseup wales, Sept. 2, 2014; photo wiseupaction/BBC)

Ada C. Bowles

Overview

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Ada C. Bowles (née Adeline Chastina Burpee) born Gloucester, MA August 2,1836 (d. 1928). Universalist minister; abolitionist; suffragist. Feminist author of hymn “Rise Up! Rise Up! O Women!” Recording Secretary, Woman’s Ministerial Conference, 1882. Supported Julia Ward Howe’s Peace Crusade for Mothers Day for peace.

Quotations

[If women were given political power], as long as they were the mothers, wives and sisters of these who would be victims of a war’s cruelty, (war) as an argument would carry little weight.” (Bucks County Gazette, Nov. 29, 1877; photo Wikipedia)

Gail Bradbrook

Overview

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Gail Bradbrook born South Elmsall, West Yorkshire, England April 30, 1972. Environmental activist. Co-founded Compassionate Revolution, 2015, and its successor Extinction Rebellion, 2018.

Quotations

Our children are at risk of not having food to eat in a few years’ time. . . the severity of this is incredible. It’s unprecedented in humanity. Human extinction in our children’s lifetime.” (BBC, Apr. 18, 2019; photo independent.academia)

Louie Bennett

Overview

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Louie Bennett born Rathgar, Dublin, Ireland January 7, 1870 (d. 1956). Irish suffragist, peace activist, labor leader, and novelist. Anti-colonialist; anti-militarist. Member of WILPF and Fellowship of Reconciliation; delegate to League of Nations and International Labor Organization. Opposed World War I, conscription, 1918. Women’s Peace Committee mediator in civil war, 1922. Life partner of pacifist Helen Chenevix. Post-World War II advocate of nuclear disarmament.

Quotations

A pacifist first, and before anything.” (Ellen Hazelkorn, Saothar, p. 34)

I do not care for a pacifism which is not truly international, which is not tolerant toward all nations.” (Sep. 3, 1966 to Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington, Hazelkorn, p. 34; photo irishtimes.com)

Eva Bacon

Overview

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Eva Bacon (née Goldner) born Vienna, Austria October 1, 1890 (d. 1994). Austrian dress designer; socialist; feminist; pacifist. Secretary for International Women’s Day; WILPF member. Resisted Hitler and Nazi regime. Opposed Vietnam War, Gulf War, nuclear weapons and tests; supported conscientious objection.

Quotations

I will die a rebel!” (Pam Young Obituaries Australia; photo flickr.com)

Claire Brady

Overview

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Claire Brady born September 9, 1968. Catholic Worker and nonviolent peace activist. Took part in Griffiss Plowshares protest, 1983. Sentenced to six months in prison for St. Patrick’s Day protest, pouring blood on Ithaca recruiting office, 2003; jailed two weeks for protest against stolen indigenous land, 2012. Arrested at Pentagon protest against war on terror, 2008; Plowshares protest at Kings Bay Trident submarine base, 2018.

Quotations

“We say, ‘the ultimate logic of Trident is omnicide,’ and yet, the explosive power of this weapon is only part of what we want to make visible. We see that nuclear weapons kill every day by their mere existence. Their production requires mining, refining, testing, and dumping of radioactive material, which poisons sacred Earth and Water, all on Indigenous land. We see the billions of dollars it takes to build and maintain the Trident system as stolen resources, which are desperately needed for human needs.” (Nuclear Resister, Apr. 16, 2018; photo peter de mott peace trot)

Adrienne Maree Brown

Overview

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Adrienne Maree Brown born El Paso, TX September 6, 1978. African-American feminist and social justice leader. Director of nonviolent direct action Ruckus Society for environmental justice, indigenous rights and migrant aid, 2006-10.

Quotations

“Nonviolent direct action has been and should be a deeply transformational and spiritual practice—we are warriors in each nonviolent direct action we do—our action is us extending ourselves towards our visions.” (“Deep Change”, Jun. 9, 2009)

“Love reaches over and under the border wall, extending care and compassion and family to those brutalized by the regressive half of our citizenry. . . Love shows us what to move toward to both free and protect what we so deeply care about. And love teaches us who will be by our sides when the terror comes.” (“Let us resolve to organize with Love”, Jan. 2, 2019; photo kresgee arts)

Marguerite Barankitse

Overview

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Marguerite “Maggy” Barankitse born Ruyigi, Burundi July 21, 1957. Rescued children during massacre, 1993. Founded Maison Shalom for 20,000 war orphans, 1993. Exiled to Rwanda, 2015; established Oasis for Peace to carry on mission of Maison Shalom, 2017. Awarded French Human Rights Prize, 1998; Bandres Prize for Asylum Rights, 1998; World Children’s Prize, 2003; Voices of Courage Award, 2004; Eleanor Roosevelt  Four Freedoms Award, 2004; Nansen Refugee Award, 2005; UNESCO Prize, 2008; Prize for Conflict Prevention, 2011; Aurora Prize for Awakening Humanity, 2016.

Quotations

"I want the new generation, Hutu and Tutsi together, who will break this cycle of violence. I will raise them in dignity, and love. When you have conviction, nobody can stop you. . . I don't want to hate. I want to believe in human beings. For me, even criminals, they are still my brothers, and I will continue to show them the light." (Christian Post, Jun. 17, 2016; photo zimbio.com)

Mabel Byrd

Overview

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Mabel Janet Byrd born Canonsburg, PA July 3, 1895 (d. 1988). Early African-American civil rights activist; internationalist. Spoke at WILPF congress on peace and racism, Prague, 1927. Worked for ILO Geneva on labor in African mandates, 1927-29. Head of Chicago Women’s Committee Against War and Fascism, 1934; chaired women’s committee against war at International Women’s Conference, Paris, 1934.

Quotations

[I]t is difficult to understand how cooperation and be substituted for conflict until those whose rule is dominant are led to change their attitude toward to minority or dominated group.” (Craig LaMay Higher Education for African Americans; photo uoregon.edu)

Virginia M. Bouvier

Overview

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Virginia “Ginny” Marie Bouvier born New Haven, CT November 9, 1960 (d. 2018). Professor of Latin American literature. Trained peacemakers. U.S. Institute of Peace facilitator of Colombia peace, 2016.

Quotations

The quality of women’s engagement and whether or not their voices are heard is essential to the sustainability of peace.” (“Gender and the Role of Women in Colombia’s Peace Process”, Mar. 4, 2016, p. 28; photo dignity memorial)

Cecile Brunschwigg

Overview

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Cecile Brunschwigg (née Cécile Kahn) born Enghien-les-Bains, France July 19, 1877 (d. 1946). French militant feminist; pacifist. Vice-President, Feminist Union for the League of Nations; Undersecretary of State for Education, 1936. Aided German refugees.

Quotations

[Women should] raise their voices so that Statesmen make war on war.” (“Le problème du désarmement à la Conférence de Paris”, La Française, Dec. 1931; photo Her Blueprint: Clio)

Judy Beaumont

Overview

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Judith Ann “Judy” Beaumont born Chicago, IL December 10, 1937 (d. 2018). Benedictine nun and math teacher; ordained priest, 2011. Trident Nein protester; served year in prison for damaging nuclear sub U.S.S. Florida, New London, CT, July 4, 1983; arrested at Pentagon for Hiroshima protest, 1981.

Quotations

We long for. . . a good for world with justice for all and compassionate people to prevail. We long for peace and justice to be the order of the day.” (Advent homily, Dec. 6, 2015; photo legacy.com)

Eleanor Barton

Overview

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Eleanor Barton (née Stockton) born Manchester, England July 13, 1872 (d. 1960). British cooperative activist. As head of Women’s Co-operative Guild, 1925-37, introduced the pacifist white poppy, 1933. Active in Peace Pledge Union and Hands Off Russia campaign.

Quotations

It will take great courage to wear white poppies when all your friends and neighbors are wearing red poppies. . . If you can walk in the streets wearing a white poppy when everyone else has a red one, I shall say you are a brave woman.” (Birmingham Gazette, Jun. 22, 1933; photo Wikipedia)

Nicoline Beck-Meyer

Overview

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Nicoline Beck-Meyer born Vendsyssel, Denmark November 27, 1856 (d. ?). Danish author and poet. Spoke on “Universal Peace” at World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893.

Quotations

Peace! What is peace? It is not rest, but growth. Peace is the condition which will be brought on when love is reigning and justice is fulfilled.” (Woman’s War for Peace, Congress of Representative Women, p. 729; photo A Celebration of Women Writers)

Julia Bacha

Overview

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Julia Bacha born Rio de Janeiro, Brazil November 17, 1980. Brazilian filmmaker. “Pay Attention to Nonviolence”, TED Talk, 2011; “How Women Wage Conflict Without Violence”, 2016. Filmography includes Budrus: A Story of Nonviolent Protest, 2009; Naila and the Uprising, 2017.

Quotations

Nonviolence is not glamorous and you don't see the effects right away. But it works.”

The greatest predictor of a movement’s decision to adopt non-violence is its ideology regarding the role of women in public life. . . when a movement includes in its discourse language of gender equality it increases dramatically the chance it will adopt non-violence and the likelihood it will succeed.” (“How Women Wage Conflict Without Violence”, 2:57, 2016; photo justvision.com)