Frances Hoggan

Overview

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Frances Hoggan (née Morgan) born Brecon, Wales December 20, 1843 (d. 1927). Social reformer; first European woman doctor. Celebrated first women’s peace petition in 17th century. Seconded peace resolution of Moral Reform Society, 1884. Spoke at first Universal Interracial Congress London, 1911. Contributor to NAACP’s Crisis on Negro progress. Promoted medical care of India’s women.

Quotations

Only in the light and warmth of sympathetic appreciation and encouragement is it to be expected that the Negro race will do its best for the world. . . May the next half-century see many of its difficulties and hindrances removed and may a better understanding prevail between white and black in America, to their mutual advantage and to the furtherance of a brotherhood throughout the world.” (The Crisis, Feb. 1920, p. 176; photo wikipedia)

Anna Grossnickle Hines

Overview

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Anna Grossnickle Hines born Cincinnati, OH July 13, 1946. Children’s book author and illustrator; teacher and poet. Published Peace Pieces: Poems and Quilts About Peace, 2011.

Quotations

Peace has always been important to me, all kinds of peace, from an inner calm to the end of wars all over the earth.”

the voices on NPR discuss suicide bombs, starvation, 
rape, increased troop levels, torture
I stitch my quilts. . .

I sit in meditation on my cushion
sending loving kindness to all beings. . .

Everything is sacred Everything connected 
I stitch and tend and smile and listen and pray 
and breathe It counts 
It all counts

(“Creating Peaceful Pieces”; photo aghinescom)

Helena Hill

Overview

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Helena Hill Weed born Norwalk, CT August 15, 1875 (d. 1958). Suffragist; one of first women geologists. Arrested three times; jailed three days for banner quoting Declaration of Independence: “GOVERNMENTS DERIVE THEIR JUST POWER FROM THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED.” Sentenced to six months at Occoquan Prison workhouse, 1918. Anti-imperialist Secretary Haiti-Santo Domingo Independence Society. Founded Women’s Press Club.

Quotations

How Haiti was reduced to the state of a conquered province; how the process was prepared in Washington long before intervention began; how little excuse there was for American intervention, and how little America has accomplished there apart from killing Haitians—these things have become a matter of public record.” (Nation, Nov. 9, 1921; photo suffragist memorial)

Estrid Hein

Overview

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Estrid Hein (née Hansen) born Øregaard, Denmark July 27, 1873 (d. 1956). First Danish woman ophthalmologist; suffragist and women’s rights activist. Active in League of Nations abolition of White Slave traffic, and protection of children.

Quotations

In my capacity as a woman, I must say that I have always had a distrust of a society as organized by men. This distrust has grown with the war, and I feel that if the women of Europe had only more say in the governing of their countries this terrible slaughter of soldiers and civilians would have been avoided. We women may have our faults, yet it is our instinctive impulse to preserve our children from the cruelties and horrors of the battlefield. As a doctor, as a mother and a woman I am beginning to put the value of individual life before that of this terrible campaign.” (Jan. 1915, in Edward van Zile, The Game of Empires, p. 262; photo piethein.com)

Florence Holbrook

Overview

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Florence Holbrook born Peru, IL May 30, 1860 (d. 1932). Chicago educator, poet, and suffragist; ardent pacifist. Delegate to Women's Peace Congress, 1915. American Peace Society, 1913. Sailed on Ford Peace Ship, 1915; John Dewey mission to Russia, 1928.

Quotations

In your hands more than any other lies the future of the world. You must choose whether you will train the rising generation in the militaristic spirit that has engulfed Europe in death, desolation and misery or whether you will use your every endeavor to counteract the legacy of hate that will be bequeathed to the children and will teach them that only in the time of peace is the progress of the world possible.” (Florence Holbrook, Kate Blake, and Grace DeGraff, To the Teachers of All the World, 1915; portrait Univ. South Florida)

Sarah Hipperson

Overview

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Sarah Hipperson born Glasgow, Scotland October 27, 1927 (d. 2018). Nurse midwife. Co-founded Catholic Peace Action, 1982. One of longest residents at Women’s Peace Camp Greenham, 1983-2002. Served 22 sentences, the longest for 28 days at Holloway Prison.

Quotations

We have all been involved in the crime that presents itself as nuclear deterrent. The bottom line is that we will use weapons that are 80 per cent more powerful than the Hiroshima bomb, in the case of Trident, as part of the defence policy of this country. . . As a Christian I have never been able to live with that.” (Ilford Recorder, Oct. 31, 2017; photo BBC news)

Idy Hegnauer

Overview

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Idy Hegnauer (née Häberling) born Zürich, Switzerland September 12, 1909 (d. 2006). Swiss Quaker humanitarian worker. Member of International Service Corps; aided Spanish Civil War refugees, 1937-38; Gaza relief, 1948-50; India and Pakistan, 1950-51; Greece, 1954-55; Algeria, 1958-60.

Quotations

A life dedicated to fellow human beings. . . can also be enriching and personal fulfillment, and lead to inner maturity.” (autobiog. In Service Civil International archives “so hat es begonnen”; photo SCI archives)

Philippine van Heerdt tot Eversberg-Quarles van Ufford

Overview

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Philippine van Heerdt tot Eversberg-Quarles van Ufford born Ketandan, Java, Dutch East Indies December 5, 1862 (d. 1939). Dutch peace activist, feminist, and artist. President, World Union of Women for International Peace, 1937. Leader of Society for League of Nations and Peace. (photo het biografische ortraat)

Loujain al-Hathloul

Overview

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Loujain al-Hathloul born Jeddah, Saudi Arabia July 31, 1989. Saudi human rights advocate. Arrested for driving, 2014; tortured, released with pledge of silence; arrested again, 2018.

Quotations

“I am with the uprising of women in the Arab world because I can think and fully practice my religion [like men].” (Wikiquote “Did Facebook censor an Arab Women’s Rights Group”, Nov. 13, 2012)

“I will win. Not immediately, but definitely.” (Wikiquote, Mar. 5, 2017 by Shiromi Pinto, Amnesty International; photo thestar.com)

Helga Herz

Overview

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Helga Herz born Güstrow, Mecklenburg, Germany August 9, 1912 (d. 2010). Second-generation American peace activist with Detroit WILPF and Wayne State University Center for Peace; Librarian, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies. Carried on the work of her mother Alice Herz, the first American to die of self-immolation, protesting Vietnam War, 1965.

Quotations

On her mother's death: “She was trying to give her final witness to her abhorrence for all war.” (Detroit News, March 18, 1965; photo 40 days with peacemakers)

Hanan Al Hroub

Overview

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Hanan Al Hroub born Bethlehem, Palestine March 6, 1972. Teacher. Awarded million-dollar Global Teacher Prize (“Nobel Prize for Teaching”) for her teaching ”No to Violence,” 2016.

Quotations

Each day, the role of the teacher is reinforced and its importance confirmed as the world questions what future we want for our children.” (acceptance speech, Guardian, Mar. 13, 2016; photo globalteacherprize.org)

bell hooks

Overview

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bell hooks (née Gloria Jean Watkins) born Hopkinsvillle, KY September 25, 1952. African-American feminist, writer, and nonviolent social activist; anti-militarist, anti-imperialist. Follower of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Quotations

The greatest movement for social justice our country has ever known is the civil rights movement and it was totally rooted in a love ethic.”

Central to that love is the question of forgiveness. . . the civil rights movement. . . was so effective, because it urged people to value forgiving one's enemies.” (CNN interview, Feb. 17, 2000)

Advocates of feminism who are concerned about militarism must insist that feminists must insist that women are not inherently life-affirming or non-violent. Many women who mother are very violent. . . Feminists must insist that women who do choose (whether or not they are inspired by motherhood) to denounce violence, domination, and its ultimate expression—war—are political thinkers making political choices.” (Talking Back, p. 95; photo Charlie Rose)

Alice Mary Higgins

Overview

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Alice Mary Higgins born Galway, Ireland June 17, 1975. Irish Senator who formed Oireachtas Neutrality, Peace and Disarmament group in Irish parliament.

Quotations

Ireland needs to value and reaffirm the neutrality which has underpinned our proud record of multilateralism, our historic role in disarmament and our international reputation as credible peacekeepers and peace brokers.” (July 5, 2018)

Peace building is not passive, its hard work, and Ireland is respected, credible and effective internationally. . . We are respected, introduced nuclear non-proliferation treaty, won global ban on cluster bombs, mediated in Colombia.” (Dec. 9, 2017; photo twitter.com)

Amy Hagopian

Overview

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Amy Hagopian born Ann Arbor, MI November 27, 1955. Peace activist against nuclear weapons, Iraq War, Gaza. Professor of Public Health, focusing on war’s effect on health and its prevention. Received American Pubic Heath Association Peace Award, 2018.

Quotations

War is, of course, toxic to health. War produces death, disables people and erodes infrastructure that supports health, yet it is entirely preventable.” (University of Washington School of Public Global Health; photo Univ. Wash. Global Health)

Lina Haag

Overview

Lina Haag (née Jäger) born Gschwend, Baden-Württemberg, Germany January 20, 1907 (d. 2012). German resistance leader; communist. Twice imprisoned, 1933, 1933-38.

Quotations

What is the authority of the State, the power of the State? Terror. . . horror and fear of that State are its power and authority. It is true that I stood out against that power and authority.” (Sybil Oldfield, Thinking Against the Current, p. 182; photo stehsatz.com)

Latifah Habachi

Overview

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Latifah Habachi born Tunis, Tunisia August 13, 1972. Lawyer and politician. Served on committee to draft new constitution following Jasmine Revolution, 2011. Member of Tunisian parliament, 2014. Supported Women’s Boat to Gaza from Barcelona to Sicily as crew member, 2016.

Quotations

The Women’s Boat for Gaza is women worldwide who wish to make visible the spirit of indomitable resistance of Palestinian women, in a show of solidarity, to send them a message of hope to behind the walls of their prison in Gaza.” (Femmes Maghrebines, Sep. 6, 2016; photo capradio.tn)