Loujain al-Hathloul

Overview

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Loujain al-Hathloul born Jeddah, Saudi Arabia July 31, 1989. Saudi human rights advocate. Arrested for driving, 2014; tortured, released with pledge of silence; arrested again, 2018.

Quotations

“I am with the uprising of women in the Arab world because I can think and fully practice my religion [like men].” (Wikiquote “Did Facebook censor an Arab Women’s Rights Group”, Nov. 13, 2012)

“I will win. Not immediately, but definitely.” (Wikiquote, Mar. 5, 2017 by Shiromi Pinto, Amnesty International; photo thestar.com)

Helga Herz

Overview

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Helga Herz born Güstrow, Mecklenburg, Germany August 9, 1912 (d. 2010). Second-generation American peace activist with Detroit WILPF and Wayne State University Center for Peace; Librarian, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies. Carried on the work of her mother Alice Herz, the first American to die of self-immolation, protesting Vietnam War, 1965.

Quotations

On her mother's death: “She was trying to give her final witness to her abhorrence for all war.” (Detroit News, March 18, 1965; photo 40 days with peacemakers)

Hanan Al Hroub

Overview

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Hanan Al Hroub born Bethlehem, Palestine March 6, 1972. Teacher. Awarded million-dollar Global Teacher Prize (“Nobel Prize for Teaching”) for her teaching ”No to Violence,” 2016.

Quotations

Each day, the role of the teacher is reinforced and its importance confirmed as the world questions what future we want for our children.” (acceptance speech, Guardian, Mar. 13, 2016; photo globalteacherprize.org)

bell hooks

Overview

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bell hooks (née Gloria Jean Watkins) born Hopkinsvillle, KY September 25, 1952. African-American feminist, writer, and nonviolent social activist; anti-militarist, anti-imperialist. Follower of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Quotations

The greatest movement for social justice our country has ever known is the civil rights movement and it was totally rooted in a love ethic.”

Central to that love is the question of forgiveness. . . the civil rights movement. . . was so effective, because it urged people to value forgiving one's enemies.” (CNN interview, Feb. 17, 2000)

Advocates of feminism who are concerned about militarism must insist that feminists must insist that women are not inherently life-affirming or non-violent. Many women who mother are very violent. . . Feminists must insist that women who do choose (whether or not they are inspired by motherhood) to denounce violence, domination, and its ultimate expression—war—are political thinkers making political choices.” (Talking Back, p. 95; photo Charlie Rose)

Alice Mary Higgins

Overview

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Alice Mary Higgins born Galway, Ireland June 17, 1975. Irish Senator who formed Oireachtas Neutrality, Peace and Disarmament group in Irish parliament.

Quotations

Ireland needs to value and reaffirm the neutrality which has underpinned our proud record of multilateralism, our historic role in disarmament and our international reputation as credible peacekeepers and peace brokers.” (July 5, 2018)

Peace building is not passive, its hard work, and Ireland is respected, credible and effective internationally. . . We are respected, introduced nuclear non-proliferation treaty, won global ban on cluster bombs, mediated in Colombia.” (Dec. 9, 2017; photo twitter.com)

Amy Hagopian

Overview

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Amy Hagopian born Ann Arbor, MI November 27, 1955. Peace activist against nuclear weapons, Iraq War, Gaza. Professor of Public Health, focusing on war’s effect on health and its prevention. Received American Pubic Heath Association Peace Award, 2018.

Quotations

War is, of course, toxic to health. War produces death, disables people and erodes infrastructure that supports health, yet it is entirely preventable.” (University of Washington School of Public Global Health; photo Univ. Wash. Global Health)

Lina Haag

Overview

Lina Haag (née Jäger) born Gschwend, Baden-Württemberg, Germany January 20, 1907 (d. 2012). German resistance leader; communist. Twice imprisoned, 1933, 1933-38.

Quotations

What is the authority of the State, the power of the State? Terror. . . horror and fear of that State are its power and authority. It is true that I stood out against that power and authority.” (Sybil Oldfield, Thinking Against the Current, p. 182; photo stehsatz.com)

Latifah Habachi

Overview

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Latifah Habachi born Tunis, Tunisia August 13, 1972. Lawyer and politician. Served on committee to draft new constitution following Jasmine Revolution, 2011. Member of Tunisian parliament, 2014. Supported Women’s Boat to Gaza from Barcelona to Sicily as crew member, 2016.

Quotations

The Women’s Boat for Gaza is women worldwide who wish to make visible the spirit of indomitable resistance of Palestinian women, in a show of solidarity, to send them a message of hope to behind the walls of their prison in Gaza.” (Femmes Maghrebines, Sep. 6, 2016; photo capradio.tn)

Nina Hagen

Overview

Nina Hagen (née Catharina Hagen) born East Berlin, German Democratic Republic March 11, 1955. German singer, songwriter, actress; “Godmother of Punk”; antiwar, anti-nuclear; active protest on Iraq War; funded Afghan relief with song of sadness.

Quotations

We are the people of a good spirit, the people of love, the people of peace and freedom. And that's what we have to fight for now, with the only weapon that is really good: with our love.” (“I prefer peace”, Feb. 2, 2002)

There's going to be a big disaster
(Nobody understands, you I hope)
Gonna be war, war number three
(Dennis, Tom)
Going to be a war, something I know it, I know already,
(Sigmund Freud, I confide)
I know it now already, I can feel it though already.
Moscow's gonna become
(One day we will be free)
Washington's going to be number two
(We will be for labor day)
Big big big big disaster's gonna come
(One day we will be free)

(“Born in Xixax”; photo pinterest)

Aminatou Haidar

Overview

Aminatou Haidar born Akka, Western Sahara, Morocco July 24, 1966. “The Sahrawi Gandhi.” Abducted by Moroccan authorities while participating in nonviolent demonstration for Saharan independence, 1987; held without trial, imprisoned, tortured and eventually released, 1991. Beaten and imprisoned, 2005-06. Earned international attention and support for 32-day hunger strike at Lanzarote Airport, 2009.

Quotations

Just imagine many children instead of drawing toys; they draw a policeman with a gun and a stick beating people and people behind bars. I am scared that they will become violent and incite violence. . . because practicing violence, one day will incite violence. . . It is our role as human rights defenders to call for peace.” (Sandblast Arts, Dec. 14, 2009; photo frontlinedefenders.org)

Helen Hakena

Overview

Helen Samu Hakena born Gogohe, Buka Island, Bougainville September 13, 1955. Bougainville peacemaker in 1990-2001 war; co-founded Leitana Nehan Women’s Development Agency (LNWDA) 1992 with motto “women weaving Bougainville together.”

Quotations

Colonialism and the war have eroded women’s traditional leadership, conflict resolution and custodial roles. Through our advocacy work we are trying to re-establish women’s roles.”

We can break the cycle of violence by putting women in positions of power.” (Neena Bhandari, India Voice; photo apwld.com)

Joan Halifax

Overview

Joan Halifax born Hanover, NH June 30, 1942. Zen master (rōshi); anthropologist; activist against Vietnam War and for civil rights, 1960s. Founder and Abbot of Upaya Zen Peacemaking Center, Santa Fe, 1990.

Quotations

"US, do not bomb Syria. Violence does not end with violence. . . as one person said: war is so over! feed people. educate people, love people. communicate, reach across lines, send instead of guns, send bread, send women, send books, send the strength of our hearts, not fear, not retribution. eye for an eye is not the way." (Facebook, September 9, 2013; Wikipedia photo with Dalai Lama)

Nadja Halilbegovich

Overview

Nadja Halilbegovich born Sarajevo, Bosnia July 29, 1979. Author and poet; musician; peace activist and lecturer; wounded age 12 Sarajevo.

Quotations

"War taught me that every human being has a dark and bright side. It is our choice to fight the darker side and show our warm and beautiful feelings or to let ourselves be weak and hopeless, bitter and mean." (Michael Collopy, Architects for Peace, 2001; photo Wikipedia)

Gisele Halimi

Overview

Gisèle Halimi (née Zeiza Gisèle Élise Taïeb) born La Goulette, Tunisia July 27, 1927. French-Tunisian human rights lawyer; feminist activist. Along with Bertrand Russell and Jean-Paul Sartre, among others, presided over war crimes tribunal, condemning American actions in Vietnam as war crimes of genocide and torture, 1967. Defended Algerian nationalist Djamila Boupacha, who had been tortured by the French, 1960. Publicly condemned Algeria War, specifically French torture of Algerian citizens, 1961. Founded feminist reproductive freedom organization Choisir, 1971.

Quotations

[W]hat is important to me: the defense of the physical and moral integrity of individuals, the rights of the human person, the fight against torture, the fight against colonialism.” (interview http://bf.8ethique.free.fr/8halimi.htm; photo mémoites algériennes.com)

Prathia Hall

Overview

Prathia Hall born Philadelphia, PA January 1, 1940 (d. 2002). Nonviolent leader of civil rights movement. Early woman organizer of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in SW Georgia, 1961; Albany movement; Selma, 1963. Credited with phrase “I have a Dream!” Often shot at and arrested; Martin Luther King. Jr. professor, Boston University.

Quotations

"We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes." (Wikipedia; photo penny liberty)

Constanze Hallgarten

Overview

Constanze Hallgarten born Leipzig, Germany September 12, 1881 (d. 1969). Leading German Jewish pacifist; co-founded WILPF; leader of German Peace Cartel (DFK); organized Munich Peace Exhibition 1927; exiled by Hitler.

Quotations

"How much less dangerous way to live, to go along with the herd and thoughtless old tradition, rather than swim against the tide for ones beliefs and to become an 'outcast' with all its results." (Pacifist in Germany, 1940; photo Europeana)