Helga Herz

Overview

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Helga Herz born Güstrow, Mecklenburg, Germany August 9, 1912 (d. 2010). Second-generation American peace activist with Detroit WILPF and Wayne State University Center for Peace; Librarian, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies. Carried on the work of her mother Alice Herz, the first American to die of self-immolation, protesting Vietnam War, 1965.

Quotations

On her mother's death: “She was trying to give her final witness to her abhorrence for all war.” (Detroit News, March 18, 1965; photo 40 days with peacemakers)

bell hooks

Overview

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bell hooks (née Gloria Jean Watkins) born Hopkinsvillle, KY September 25, 1952. African-American feminist, writer, and nonviolent social activist; anti-militarist, anti-imperialist. Follower of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Quotations

The greatest movement for social justice our country has ever known is the civil rights movement and it was totally rooted in a love ethic.”

Central to that love is the question of forgiveness. . . the civil rights movement. . . was so effective, because it urged people to value forgiving one's enemies.” (CNN interview, Feb. 17, 2000)

Advocates of feminism who are concerned about militarism must insist that feminists must insist that women are not inherently life-affirming or non-violent. Many women who mother are very violent. . . Feminists must insist that women who do choose (whether or not they are inspired by motherhood) to denounce violence, domination, and its ultimate expression—war—are political thinkers making political choices.” (Talking Back, p. 95; photo Charlie Rose)

Amy Hagopian

Overview

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Amy Hagopian born Ann Arbor, MI November 27, 1955. Peace activist against nuclear weapons, Iraq War, Gaza. Professor of Public Health, focusing on war’s effect on health and its prevention. Received American Pubic Heath Association Peace Award, 2018.

Quotations

War is, of course, toxic to health. War produces death, disables people and erodes infrastructure that supports health, yet it is entirely preventable.” (University of Washington School of Public Global Health; photo Univ. Wash. Global Health)

Joan Halifax

Overview

Joan Halifax born Hanover, NH June 30, 1942. Zen master (rōshi); anthropologist; activist against Vietnam War and for civil rights, 1960s. Founder and Abbot of Upaya Zen Peacemaking Center, Santa Fe, 1990.

Quotations

"US, do not bomb Syria. Violence does not end with violence. . . as one person said: war is so over! feed people. educate people, love people. communicate, reach across lines, send instead of guns, send bread, send women, send books, send the strength of our hearts, not fear, not retribution. eye for an eye is not the way." (Facebook, September 9, 2013; Wikipedia photo with Dalai Lama)

Prathia Hall

Overview

Prathia Hall born Philadelphia, PA January 1, 1940 (d. 2002). Nonviolent leader of civil rights movement. Early woman organizer of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in SW Georgia, 1961; Albany movement; Selma, 1963. Credited with phrase “I have a Dream!” Often shot at and arrested; Martin Luther King. Jr. professor, Boston University.

Quotations

"We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it comes." (Wikipedia; photo penny liberty)

Fannie Lou Hamer

Overview

Fannie Lou Hamer born Ruleville, MS October 6, 1917 (d. 1977). Civil rights activist; organizer of Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, 1962; nonviolent trainer for Mississippi Freedom Summer, 1964.

Quotations

"We are sick and tired of our people having to go to Vietnam and other places to fight for something we don't have here." (1964 photo Wikipedia)

Alice Hamilton

Overview

Alice Hamilton born New York, NY February 27, 1869 (d. 1970). Physician; pioneer in industrial toxicology. Co-founded WILPF, 1915; went on peace mission to capitals of belligerent nations with Jane Addams; US representative to League of Nations Health Committee. Opposed Cold War and Vietnam War.

Quotations

We may come to see that they who appear to be the victors have lost the things that really matter, and that the losers may in the end have won them; that they who drew the sword have perished by the sword while the dumb, mute masses whom they led into war remain to possess the earth.” (The New Republic, Jun. 24, 1919, p. 245, cited in Vicki McCoy thesis)

Nor can you sow war and harvest peace. The seeds of war can only produce more wars.” (“Because War Breeds War”, Catt and Hamilton, Why Wars Must Cease, 1935, p. 128; photo Spartacus Educational)

Judith Hand

Overview

Judith Hand born Cherokee, OK February 4, 1940. American biologist; ethologist; novelist. Pioneered study of biological origins of war.

Quotations

Because of genetic inclinations that are as deeply rooted as the bonding-for-aggression inclinations of men, most women would prefer to make or keep the peace, the sooner the better.” (Women, Power, and the Biology of Peace, 2003, p. 45)

If women around the world in the twenty-first century would get their act together they could, partnered with men of like mind, shift the direction of world history to create a future without war.” (A Future Without War, 2006, p. 53; photo afww.wordpress.com)

Daryl Hannah

Overview

Daryl Hannah born Chicago, IL December 3, 1960. Actress; eco-activist who has protested whaling, logging, sexual slavery, Amazon oil; jailed for farm protest; participated in civil disobedience against Iraq War, Los Angeles, 2006; arrested 2006, 2009, 2011.

Quotations

"All of the actions we take that result in health crises, environmental degradation, slavery, extinctions and war as interlinked, so I do what I can to try to share information in order to enable ourselves to make wiser, more informed choices." (Off-grid 101, Nov. 3, 2009; photo 2009 wiki commons pd)

Lorraine Hansberry

Overview

Lorraine Hansberry born Chicago, IL May 19, 1930 (d. 1965). Playwright who wrote first Black play for Broadway, "A Raisin in the Sun", 1959; supported Women Strike for Peace opposition to House Un-American Activities Committee investigation 1962.

Quotations

"In these perilous times, when the fate of the world is in such delicate balance, the fullest debate of the issue of war and peace is vital to survival. . . Freedom of ideas has always been a national necessity." (photo Wikipedia)

Sarah Harder

Overview

Sarah Harder born Chicago, IL September 9, 1937. President National Peace Foundation 2000; feminist professor; president AAUW 1985-9; President of Women for Meaningful Summit encouraging end of Cold War 1990; co-chaired the 1990 Soviet-American Women's Summit; leader of International Federation of University Women and NOW; promoted UN peacemaking and gender equality; peacemaking in Caucasus 1992. Coined term "feminization of power."

Quotations

"Feminization of power uses the power of inclusion and engagement with the understanding that the more you bring together, the more energy you create." (Marci Korb interview, University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, "Vision"; photo sophia.smith)

Georgia Harkness

Overview

Georgia Harkness born Harkness, NY April 21, 1891 (d. 1978). Ecumenical pacifist theologian and professor who opposed World War II, nuclear weapons.

Quotations

"International order, first through the United Nations and eventually through a more inclusive world federation of nations, is the only sure road to peace." (Christian Ethics, ch. XI; photo Wikipedia)

Angie Harmon

Overview

Angie Harmon born Highland Park, TX August 10, 1957. Actress; named UNICEF Ambassador 2013.

Quotations

"After learning the horrifying practice of child trafficking both in the United States and abroad, I knew I had to do something about it. That's what drew me to UNICEF. . . I believe that zero children should be forced into prostitution or made to work, especially at dangerous jobs." (UPI, Jan 2, 2013; photo Wikipedia)

Frances Harper

Overview

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper born Baltimore, MD September 24, 1825 (d. 1911). Black non-resistant abolitionist poet; novelist and lecturer; sat-in on Philadelphia trolley 1859.

Quotations

Our world, so worn and weary,
Needs music, pure and strong. . .

Music to soothe all its sorrow,
Till war and crime shall cease;
And the hearts of men grown tender
Girdle the world with peace.

("Songs for the People"; photo Unitarian Universalist Assn.)

Mary McDonough Harren

Overview

Mary McDonough Harren born September 4, 1925. Catholic Worker mother founded Peace & Justice House, Wichita, KS. First protest at Kansas military base; opposed Vietnam War, Salvador intervention; protested nuclear waste train.

Quotations

"Our mission is to support the worldwide struggle for justice and peace through education and non-violent action."

"Just who decided that pro-choice was pro-abortion? What lousy thinking. Had to be a celibate male." (Nov. 6, 2008; wichitapeace.org)

"How can we not remember the 2-3 million Vietnamese we killed for no other reason (I've forgotten why we were in Vietnam) than to stop the domino effect or to keep the Vietnam communist from landing in Long Beach? And how about the millions of Iraqis who were sacrificed for Bush's non-existent weapons of mass destruction. We got in Afghanistan but we can't get out." (Truthout, Nov. 11, 2012; photo wichitapeace.org)

Florence Jaffray Harriman

Overview

Florence Jaffray Harriman (née Hurst) born Manhattan, NY July 21, 1870 (d. 1967). Suffragist, social reformer, and advocate of League of Nations; Ambassador to Norway 1943, aiding escape of royal family and Nazi opponents from Norway; one of first books on Holocaust.

Quotations

"There is no future for a Christian world but in truly and generously respecting the dignity of all men, and in working relentlessly that some equality of opportunity be common to all races and classes. . . There must come a sharing of all food, and of all culture." (Mission to the North, p. 325, 1941; photo Wikipedia)