Margaret Cole

Overview

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Margaret Postgate Cole born Cambridge, England May 6, 1893 (d. 1980). British pacifist poet; leading Fabian Socialist; feminist. Opposed World War I; promoted conscientious objection.

Quotations

Today, as I rode by,
I saw the brown leaves dropping from their tree
In a still afternoon,
When no wind whirled them whistling to the sky,
But thickly, silently,
They fell, like snowflakes wiping out the noon;
And wandered slowly thence
For thinking of a gallant multitude
Which now all withering lay,
Slain by no wind of age or pestilence,
But in their beauty strewed

Like snowflakes falling on the Flemish clay.

(“The Falling Leaves”, Nov. 1915; photo Spartacus)

Anne Cobden-Sanderson

Overview

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Anne Cobden-Sanderson born London, England March 26, 1853 (d. 1926). British suffragist; socialist. Early WILPF leader. Arrested for suffrage protest, 1906; served one month of two-month sentence at Holloway Prison. Arrested again, 1909, 1910. Co-founded Women’s Tax Resistance League, 1909. Signed women pacifist friendship to German women, 1917. Opposed World War I.

Quotations

We have talked so much for the Cause now let us suffer for it. . . I am a law breaker because I want to be a law maker.” (at trial, Oct. 1909; photo Spartacus.com)

Helen Chenevix

Overview

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Helen Chenevix born Blackrock, Ireland November 13, 1886 (d. 1963). Irish suffragist, Quaker, and trade union leader. Worked for world peace and nuclear disarmament with partner Louie Bennett in WILPF, Fellowship of Reconciliation, and Irish Pacifist League. Gave refuge to Jews, 1937; postwar vice president of Irish Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. (photo with Louie Bennett, wikicommons)

Casey Camp-Horinek

Overview

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Casey Camp-Horinek born Nebraska June 6, 1948. Native American (Ponca) leader; board member of Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, International (WECAN). Drafted first International Indigenous Women’s Treaty, protecting Rights of Nature, Paris, 2015. Arrested for nonviolent protest at Standing Rock, 2017. Spoke at the UN Forum on Indigenous Issues.

Quotations

Life on Mother Earth is in danger and coming to a time of great transformation. As Indigenous Peoples, from the global South and North, we are accepting the responsibility designated by our prophecies to tell the world that we must live in peace with each other and Mother Earth to ensure the harmony within Creation.” (Jan. 17, 2014, Quito Ecuador;  photo moms clean airforce)

Carmen Casco de Lara Castro

Overview

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Carmen Casco de Lara Castro born Asunción, Paraguay June 17, 1918 (d. 1993). Paraguayan human rights advocate. Founding president Commission for the Defense of Human Rights; resigned from Chamber of Deputies in protest of violation of presidential term limits, 1977.

Quotations

Let us turn [Paraguay] into a country without political prisoners, where justice will reign so fairly that it will shelter everyone, without the cancer of torture carried out by men who get drunk on another person’s pain, as if they had taken drugs. With Christian love we should put an end to hate if we don’t want it to have power over Paraguayans. May God grant that violence finds no inspiration in Paraguay. We must combat treasonous assaults in our country with justice and not with violence.” (Dec. 15, 1977 resignation speech; photo Wikipedia)

Carmen Casco de Lara Castro born Asunción, Paraguay June 17, 1918 (d. 1993). Paraguayan human rights advocate. Founding president Commission for the Defense of Human Rights; resigned from Chamber of Deputies in protest of violation of presidential term limits, 1977.

Quotations

Let us turn [Paraguay] into a country without political prisoners, where justice will reign so fairly that it will shelter everyone, without the cancer of torture carried out by men who get drunk on another person’s pain, as if they had taken drugs. With Christian love we should put an end to hate if we don’t want it to have power over Paraguayans. May God grant that violence finds no inspiration in Paraguay. We must combat treasonous assaults in our country with justice and not with violence.” (Dec. 15, 1977 resignation speech; photo Wikipedia)

Carmen Casco de Lara Castro born Asunción, Paraguay June 17, 1918 (d. 1993). Paraguayan human rights advocate. Founding president Commission for the Defense of Human Rights; resigned from Chamber of Deputies in protest of violation of presidential term limits, 1977.

Quotations

Let us turn [Paraguay] into a country without political prisoners, where justice will reign so fairly that it will shelter everyone, without the cancer of torture carried out by men who get drunk on another person’s pain, as if they had taken drugs. With Christian love we should put an end to hate if we don’t want it to have power over Paraguayans. May God grant that violence finds no inspiration in Paraguay. We must combat treasonous assaults in our country with justice and not with violence.” (Dec. 15, 1977 resignation speech; photo Wikipedia)

Constance Curry

Overview

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Constance “Connie” Curry born Paterson, NJ July 17, 1933. Civil rights activist and author. Early organizer, first white woman on Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) board, 1960; Great Southern National Student Association organizer, 1953; National Field Representative Collegiate Council for UN, 1960-64; Southern Field Rep. American Friends Service Committee, 1964-73.

Quotations

I couldn’t eat with my [black] friends, and knew then that segregation took away my personal freedom as surely as if I were bound by invisible chains.” (1953, in A Woman of the South, p. 5; photo crmvet.org)

Violeta Chamorro

Overview

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Violeta Chamorro born Rivas, Nicaragua October 10, 1929. “The Great Conciliator.” Nicaraguan President 1990-96; newspaper publisher. As first female elected president in Americas, ended 12-year-long Nicaraguan civil war; abolished the draft; halved size of army; bought up weapons and buried them in concrete in Peace Plaza.

Quotations

I have no ideology beyond national ‘reconciliation.’ (Anne-Wil Harzing, International Human Resource Management, p. 294; photo escademic)

Estee Chandler

Overview

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Estee Chandler born Tarzana, CA October 1, 1964. Actress. Founded Jewish Voice for Peace, Los Angeles, 2010. Arrested for occupying Senator Feinstein’s office to protest pro-Israel policy on Gaza siege, 2014.

Quotations

Too many people who are with us are afraid. Ultimately nonviolence is the only thing that has ever won out.” (Haaretz, May 11, 2018)

There can and will be no peace in the Middle East until there is genuine peace in the lands called Israel and Palestine; and that will only come with equal rights, security and justice for all who live there. For that to become a reality, the status quo has got to go.” (Mondoweiss, Aug. 20, 2014; photo memory alpha)

Dorothy Cotton

Overview

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Dorothy Cotton born Goldsboro, NC January 5, 1930 (d. 2018). Civil rights leader. Education Director, Southern Christian Leadership Conference; tear-gassed by US bombers on visit to Vietnam for Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Quotations

I think I lived through the period where we thought we'd get the whole world understanding nonviolence. . . We became the big model for the world. . . We take some pride in that.” (Rob Montana interview, Feb. 2, 2011)

If a house is burning, and bucket of water is thrown on the blaze and doesn't extinguish the fire, this doesn't mean that water won't put out fire. It means we need more water. And so with nonviolence.”

The powerful weapon of love and nonviolence that must be used to right the wrong. . . I believe this tool, this philosophy, this spirit and way of nonviolence will successfully take us to the next leg of our journey toward wholeness. I hope the study of nonviolence will become a basic part of the curriculum of our public education system. I’m convinced nonviolence can be successful in working for positive change in our relations with other countries right now.” (If Your Back’s Not Bent, p 5; photo pdaspeaker)

Fanny Jackson Coppin

Overview

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Fanny Jackson Coppin born Washington DC January 8, 1837 (d. 1913). African-American educator; taught Greek, Latin and mathematics. Born a slave. First African-American school principal, 1869. Delegate to missionary conference, London, 1888; followed by European tour. Missionary to Cape Town, South Africa, where she founded Bethel Institute. Spoke at World’s Congress of Representative Women, Chicago, 1893.

Quotations

Love wins when everything else will fail. You say that your child resists all your efforts to break him of his bad habits and make him become good. Have you tried kindness? Have you tried love?” (Reminiscences, p. 58)

On Violence in South Africa: “Much wisdom and patience will be required on the part of our ministers and teachers lest they should add to the spirit of unrest that comes of injustice and proscription. Wisdom dictates that by all means a conflict between the races should be avoided. The Europeans, armed and drilled, would have the advantage of all others, and there could be but one result. The Kingdom of God does not proceed in its conquests by the employment of carnal weapons, and right can afford to be patient because it is bound to win in the end.
”The native people have had enough of war. Their vocation in the ages past was to war among themselves, and it would not be difficult to impress them that that is not the way to right their wrongs. But the new life which we offer them is the life of peace and good will.”
(Reminiscences, pp. 132-33; photo blackamerica.com)

Queen Charlotte of Great Britain

Overview

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Queen Charlotte of Great Britain born Lower Castle, Mirow, Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Germany May 19, 1744 (d. 1818). German princess; amateur botanist and patron of Handel and Mozart. George III married her because of her peace appeal to Frederick II the Great, 1761.

Quotations

I know Sire, that it seems unbecoming in my sex, in this age of viscous refinement, to feel for one’s country, to lament the horrors of war, or to wish for the return of peace. . . but however unbecoming it may be in me, I cannot resist the desire of interceding for this unhappy people. It was but a few years ago that this territory wore the more pleasing appearance; the country was cultivated, the peasants looked cheerful, and the towns abounded with riches and festivity. What an alteration at present from such a charming scene! . . . sure even conquerors themselves would weep at the hideous prospect now before me. The whole country, my dear country, lies one frightful waste, presenting only objects to excite pity, terror, and despair. The business of the husbandman and the shepherd is quite discontinued; the husbandman and shepherd are become soldiers themselves, and help to ravage the soil they formerly occupied.” (History of Royal Women [potentially forged statement]; photo allemannia)

Jackie Cabasso

Overview

Jacqueline "Jackie" Cabasso born New York September 10, 1952. Anti-nuclear weapons activist; speaker at NGO conferences on nuclear weapons in China, Brazil, Israel, India. NGO representative to international conferences, 1991-2014. A "founding mother" of Abolition 2000 Global Network to Eliminate Nuclear Weapons, 1995. Worked with World Court Project on legal status of nuclear weapons, 1995. Core organizer of 40,000-person New York No Nukes! No Wars! March, May 1, 2005; led International Conference for a Nuclear-Free, Peaceful, Just and Sustainable World, NY, 2010. Arrested 50+ times for nonviolent resistance in protest of American nuclear weapons at locales including Livermore Lab, Nevada Test Site, and the White House. Received Sean MacBride Peace Prize, 2008.

Quotations

"[G]lobal elimination of nuclear weapons is an imperative for our collective survival. And we know that the 'ultimate' elimination of nuclear weapons will never happen unless we demand it now." (Common Dreams, Nov. 25, 2008)

Alicia Cabezudo

Overview

Alicia Cabezudo born Rosario, Argentina October 22, 1957. Leading international peace educator; Italian professor in Argentina; vice-president International Peace Bureau 2010-16.

Quotations

Peace is not only defined as absence of war and conflict. It is also a dynamic concept that must be apprehended in positive terms linked to the pursuit of social and economic justice in which everyone plays an active part. It represents an everyday attitude of nonviolent rebellion, of peaceful dissent, a firm determination to defend human rights and human dignity.” (“State of Peace Report” 2012; photo ethicseducation)

Berta Cáceres

Overview

Berta Cáceres born La Esperanza, Intibucá, Honduras March 4, 1973 (d. 2016). Indigenous Lenca environmental activist. Led nonviolent fight against Gualcarque dam; awarded Goldman Environmental Prize, 2015.

Quotations

Let us wake up, humankind! We’re out of time. We must shake our conscience free of the rapacious capitalism, racism and patriarchy that will only assure our own self-destruction. . . Our Mother Earth, militarized, fenced-in, poisoned, a place where basic rights are systematically violated, demands that we take action. Let us build societies that are able to coexist in a dignified way, in a way that protects life. Let us come together and remain hopeful as we defend and care for the blood of this Earth and of its spirits.” (2015; quote and photo Democracy Now!)

Mary S. Calderone

Overview

Mary Steichen Calderone born Paris, France July 1, 1904 (d. 1998). Quaker Medical Director of Planned Parenthood 1953; founded SIECUS Sex Info & Education 1964; American pioneer in sex education; lifelong absolute pacifist.

Quotations

"One hardly thinks of Friends, men or women, as revolutionaries and, in truth, their outer demeanor, comportment, and life style have tended to be quite conservative. But on major social issues—slavery, peace, alternative service during war, religious ecumenicism, racial equality—on such issues Quaker concern and conscience come on strong. Quaker voices are usually heard loud and clear ‘speaking truth to power.’" (Friends General Conference, "Friends and Womankind," 1996; photo Wikipedia)

Helen Caldicott

Overview

Helen Caldicott born Melbourne, Australia August 7, 1938. Physician led international opposition to nuclear tests 1971; co-founded Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament (WAND) 1980; active in Physicians for Social Responsibility which won Nobel Prize 1985.

Quotations

"As a doctor, as well as a mother and a world citizen, I wish to practice the ultimate form of preventive medicine by ridding the earth of these technologies that propagate disease, suffering, and death." (Nuclear Madness, 1978; photo wic.org)

Mary Whiton Calkins

Overview

Mary Whiton Calkins born Hartford, CT March 30, 1863 (d. 1930). Pacifist; professor of psychology and philosophy; first female president of the American Psychological Association. Member of Fellowship of Reconciliation; member of WILPF. Defended Sacco and Vanzetti in print; advocated pacifism in World War I; believed in the ethical duty of loyalty to the universal community.

Quotations

“[T]he devotion of man to the universal community is no mystic attitude but practical service.” (Good Man & the Good, 1918, p. 59; photo feministvoices.com)

Micheline Calmy-Rey

Overview

Micheline Calmy-Rey born Chermignon, Sion, Valais July 8, 1945. First woman Swiss Foreign Minister 2003, second female President 2007; Social Democrat; member Council of Women World Leaders; co-author of UN report on "The Future We Want", Global Sustainablility 2012.

Quotations

"[F]or the majority of conflicts, the most sustainable solution is a negotiated one rather than a military victory. And for the international community it makes more sense and is more cost effective to invest in the mediation and prevention of conflicts rather than in expensive and difficult peacekeeping operations." (UN General Assembly, Sept. 21, 2011; photo de.Wikipedia)

Bhikaji Cama

Overview

Bhikhaji Cama (née Patel) born Mumbai, India September 24, 1866 (d. 1936). Indian independence leader; unfurled first tricolor flag at Socialist conference Stuttgart 1907; anti-imperialist; banned from India, arrested in France for antiwar activity 1914; interned 1916; nonviolent, but accepted resistance to violence; did relief work against the plague, which she caught 1896.

Quotations

Work for Indian's freedom and independence. When India is independent women will not only [have] the right to vote, but all other rights.” (Geraldine Forbes, Women in Modern India, p. 100; photo Wikipedia)