Frances Fox Piven

Overview

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Frances Fox Piven born Calgary, Alberta, Canada October 10, 1932. Sociology professor, social activist, and antiwar leader. Democratic Socialist; influential theorist of social change.

Quotations

I have considerable respect for non-violence, but I don’t treat it as inevitably a necessary rule. The reason I have respect for non-violence, is I think it helps to protect the protesters. . . Unless you have good reason for breaking the window, probably you shouldn’t do that. Unless it’s you know, a big part of your strategy.” (www.liveleak.com/view?i=ad1_1284522561#0DB9QCT6jB3BF0km.99)

I think that we're at an alarming moment in American political development and maybe in world political development, because the United States is so influential. If the trends of the last thirty or forty years are not halted and reversed—and those trends include increasingly inequality, a crumbling public life, a disintegrating public infrastructure, an exhausted ecology, and a huge war arsenal, and more and more war making—then I'm rather gloomy about the prospects for the American future and the harm that the United States could do to the world.” (Who’s Afraid of Frances Fox Piven, p. 255, 2011; photo gc.cuny.edu)

Mathilde Planck

Overview

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Mathilde Planck born Ulm, Württemberg, Germany November 29, 1861 (d. 1955). German pacifist teacher and editor of women’s magazines. Peace leader; founded state branch of German Peace Society, 1900; co-founded women’s branch of German Peace Society. Sent telegraph to Kaiser in appeal for peace, July 1914. Longtime member of state parliament with priority of peace. Christian pacifist who “honoured Mahatma Gandhi and Christ equally.” (Mascha Riepl-Schmidt bio)

Quotations

If something is needed, it’s got to be done.” (Rev. Harald Wagner, Heinigen; portrait Mathilde Planck Schule)

Mary Goddard Wigglesworth Pickering

Overview

Mary Goddard Wigglesworth Pickering born Boston, MA October 16, 1838 (d. 1909). Anti-imperialist; published Liberty Poems, a collection of poetry opposing US imperialism, 1900.

Quotations

And let thy flag, then honored, loved
Float o’er thy children free,
But never over conquered men,
Wherever they may be.

(“Arise Columbia”, Liberty Poems, p. 103)

Sara Hammond Palfrey

Overview

Sara Hammond Palfrey born Boston, MA December 11, 1823 (d. 1914). American poet; pacifist opposed to Spanish-American War.

Quotations

The Holy Ghost is beginning to arouse the conscience of Christendom against the superstition of war. . .
’The strangers I sought in far-off lands
To plunder, to main, to slay,
To reave them of children and wives, their homes
In ashes so red to lay’
‘Ruffian! Murderer!’
‘Nay; for I followed the multitude,
When I went to do this evil;
The long streets cheered, and we called it War!’
‘Did Christ lead, or the devil?’

(“Judgment to Come”, Springfield Republican, 1899 in Liberty Poems, p. 97)

Andrea Hofer Proudfoot

Overview

Andrea Hofer Proudfoot born March 2, 1865 (d. 1949). Children’s writer, active in kindergarten movement. Sponsored Disarm! Disarm!, the adaptation of Bertha von Suttner’s Die Waffen Nieder, and Suttner's US tour, 1913; founded Von Suttner League and League for International Amity 1913. Wrote Internationalism, 1913. Delegate to Women's Peace Congress, 1915. Supported postwar aid to Austria.

Quotations

On the Hague conference: “The hour is ripe for the peoples of this war-burdened Europe are so desperate over the agony and uncertainty in which they are constantly kept by the greedy ruling class that they are ready for the subject of disarmament as never before. . . And the women must kindle the sentiment among families and the masses. . . the women are the natural propagators. . . If we would down the war spirit at home and kill out the fear of war attack at home, we must kill out the spirit of hate from this side, where our war advisers so solemnly warn us our enemy is lurking.” (Advocate of Peace, 1915, vol. 75, p. 139)

Gabriele Petkevičaité-Bité

Overview

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Gabriele Petkevičaité-Bité born Puziniškis estate, Panevėžys, Russian Lithuania March 16, 1861 (d. 1943). Lithuanian writer. First chair of national constituent assembly which achieved peace and recognition from Russia and arbitration of Latvia boundary, 1920. Opposed World War I, which she feared would never end.

Quotations

But those are not apple-blossoms which are looking at me! They are thousands and thousands of eyes! Living human eyes! But perishing! The moisture of great tears is trembling yet in them. . . And this requires no explanation. Those are the eyes of those being killed at the fronts.” (Joseph Canning, Power, Violence, ch. 11; photo wikipedia)

Adrienne Pine

Overview

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Adrienne Pine born Birmingham, AL November 27, 1970. Professor of medical anthropology; peace activist. Protested US support of army coup of Honduras, 2009; arrested for occupying Venezuelan embassy against attempted coup, DC, 2019.

Quotations

If, by trying to protect the Venezuela embassy, I can help prevent my government from leading the world into this nightmare scenario, it will be well worth the potential damage to my career. Please join me.” (Common Dreams, May 16, 2019; photo American.edu)

Sylvia Plath

Overview

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Sylvia Plath born Boston, MA October 27, 1932 (d. 1963). Author, poet, and artist; life-long pacifist. At age of 13, wrote essay “A War to End All Wars”, 1945; “Youth’s Plea for World Peace”, 1950. Called Hiroshima “a sin.” Publicly opposed Korean War.

Quotations

For me, the real issues of our time are the issues of every time—the hurt and wonder of loving; making in all its forms—children, loaves of bread, paintings, buildings; and the conservation of life of all people in all places, the jeopardizing of which no abstract doubletalk of ‘peace’ or ‘implacable foes’ can excuse.” (London Magazine, 1962; photo britannica.com)

Emily Frost Phipps

Overview

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Emily Frost Phipps born Devonport, Devon, England November 7, 1865 (d. 1943). English barrister, teacher, and headmistress. Militant suffragist. Boycotted census by overnighting in sea cave, 1911. Opposed World War I with Women’s Freedom League. Ran for Parliament on antiwar platform, 1918.

Quotations

Many women had determined that since they could not be citizens for the purposes of voting, they would not be citizens for the purpose of helping the government to compile statistics: they would not be included in the Census Returns.” (wikpedia; photo womwnofeastbourne)

Anna Parnell

Overview

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Anna Parnell born Rathdrum, Wicklow, Ireland May 13, 1852 (d. 1911). Irish nonviolent independence leader. Co-founded Ladies’ Land League, which encouraged women to boycott and refuse land rent, 1881. Influenced nonviolent leader Michael Davitt.

Quotations

I consider the actions of particular individuals are unimportant in history, while the actions of groups, classes, etc are most important, because the former are not met again, and the latter are. I don’t mean, of course, that the actions [in themselves] are unimportant, only that it does not matter what particular individual does them, except insofar and he or she represents a number of persons.” (to Helen Molony, Jul. 7, 1910, in T. W. Moody, “Anna Parnell”, Hermathena, Summer 1974, p. 12; photo Wikipedia)

Michelle Parlevliet

Overview

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Michelle Parlevliet born Almelo, Netherlands September 27, 1971. Professor of Conflict Resolution and Human Rights, University of Amsterdam. Advisor to World Bank (Indonesia) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, 1996, 1998. South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, 1997; Centre for Conflict Resolution in South Africa, 1999-2005; Conflict transformation adviser for Denmark in Nepal civil war, 2006-09.

Quotations

“Human rights violations do not only result from destructive conflict, but may also give rise to such conflict, both latent and manifest. Rights violations can trigger unrest and violence in the short and in the long term, when rights are denied over a sustained period.” (“Human Rights and Peacebuilding: Complementary and Contradictory, Complex and Contingent”, Journal of Human Rights Practice, Nov. 2017, pp. 333–57; photo University of Amsterdam)

Betty Polster

Overview

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Elizabeth “Betty” Polster  (née Henshaw) born PA February 28, 1925 (d. 2015).  Quaker pacifist; war tax refuser. National President WILPF, 1965-69. Moved to Canadian Argenta Quaker refuge for conscientious objectors in Vietnam War protest, 1967; attended Selma March with personal friend Martin Luther King, Jr. Active in Canadian Voice of Women (VOW); co-clerk of Canadian Friends Yearly Meeting. Principal, Argenta Friends School, 1970-80.

Quotations

“Those who protest government policies which involve us in war, which one believes to be wrong, are not cowards or anti-American–but are preserving our democracy.” (Oct. 1965, Beth Taylor, Excepts from Plain Language;  photo Legacy.com)

Penny Patch

Overview

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Penelope “Penny” Patch born Manhattan, NY December 30, 1943. Civil rights worker, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), 1962-65. First white woman to work for southern voter registration, often arrested. First arrested in Maryland sit-in, 1962; took part in anti-war protests Berkeley, 1965.

Quotations

Intangible Implications of our aims and our work. . . I see it as the opening of doors to people who have always seen closed doors, seen them so much and for so long that they don't see the doors any longer.” (National Guardian, Feb. 28, 1963)

[A]ll people, however powerless they might seem, carry within themselves the ability to make great change.” (Deep in Our Hearts, p. 166; photo sistermentors)

Betty Peterson

Overview

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Betty Peterson (née Farber) born Reading, PA November 27, 1917 (d. 2018). Canadian Quaker peace activist. Conscientious objector, WWI; protested Hiroshima. Moved to Canada after Vietnam War protests, 1975. Leader of Nova Scotia Voice for Peace; organized Women’s Peace Petition of 250,000, 1981. Wore t-shirt with 60 peace buttons on New York march against nuclear weapons, 1982. Protested NATO Brussels; Greenham Common; supported Innu women’s protest, Labrador, 1987. Held 88-day peace vigil against Gulf War, Halifax Library, 1990.

Quotations

Keep on keeping on. It helps you to keep your sanity, and it gives other people hope and calls them into action.” (Globe and Mail, Mar. 16, 2018; photo women social activists)

Thania Paffenholz

Overview

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Thania Paffenholz born Cologne, Germany February 2, 1956. International peace researcher, mediator, and adviser. Director, Inclusive Peace and Transition Initiative, Geneva; founding director Center for Peacebuilding at Swisspeace, Bern. Awarded Wihuri International Prize, 2015.

Quotations

If you have a women’s only delegation at the negotiation table, these are usually the activists. From them, you can expect more [of a] push on [the] deep roots of conflict, [and] gender issues. . . [The key point], is to get these activists into positions of decision-making power, which they often do not have. More women do not equal more peace automatically. In order for inclusiveness to translate into the intended results, better peace process design and a consideration of the social, cultural context is necessary.” (International Peace Institute, Oct. 26, 2016; photo wikipedia)

Susana Pacara

Overview

Susana Pacara born Chayanta, Potosí, Bolivia May 30, 1965. Quechuan radio journalist and nonviolent organizer. Co-founded Radio Lachiwana in Cochabamba; stood up to government oppression in Coca War, 1993; organized march for dignity, 1994, national march for land and territory, 1996; fought privatization of water system by American Bechtel corporation, 2000.

Quotations

"If you're going to die, you're going to die for the cause." (Waging Nonviolence, April 1, 2014)

Biannca Pace

Overview

Biannca Pace born Rhyll, Phillip Island, Victoria, Australia March 15, 1953. First head of non-official Australian Ministry for Peace, 2005. Organized Sydney Peace Festival, 2009.

Quotations

[T]he theme this year is ‘Let Peace Prevail on Earth. . . Over the 14-hour period, Sydney will join the United Nations’ global call for ceasefire and non-violence. . . People of all ages, backgrounds, cultures and religions will hear and talk about the ideals of peace, the cost of war and celebrate the benefits of resolving disputes peacefully.” (Ministry for Peace, 21 Days, Sept 2009; photo mfpa.org.au)

Maysoon Pachachi

Overview

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Maysoon Pachachi born Washington DC September 17, 1947. Co-founded Act Together: Women Against Sanctions and War with Iraq, 2000. Film director and editor; documented Iraq occupation and the Algerian war.

Quotations

What people needed was justice, but they got revenge and that creates more violence.” (Financial Times, March 12, 2013)

"I think there's a difference between being an optimist and having hope. And you can't lose hope." (quote and photo The Guardian, April 30, 2009)

Sarah Saunders Page

Overview

Sarah Saunders Page born Waimea South, Nelson, New Zealand August 26, 1863 (d. 1950). New Zealand peace leader; Quaker feminist, Socialist; led opposition to conscription World War I in Canterbury Women’s Institute; led No More War movement 1930.

Quotations

Our contention is that war is all atrocity. It is the supreme national and international crime. It is the insanity of the age which regards brute force as the deciding power.” (May 17, 1916, to prime minister; quote and photo Voices Against War)